Saturday, August 13, 2005

Is infinity finite?

There is a question regarding whether a number that is never used actually exists - rather like
1) If a tree falls in the woods does it make a sound?
2) Or if a photon is involved in a slit experiment will it be a wave or a particle?

One could say what is the total number of points in the universe
An equation is then created using planks length and the age of the universe multiplied by the speed of light as a result you get an answer - a HUGE answer but an answer none the less.

Planks length 10^-33 cm cubed
Universe 156 billion light years wide (x 9460800000000 to get km)
(http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mystery_monday_040524.html) = approx 10^20cm

10^53*10^53*10^53 (the circle square problem is already more or less adjusted for)
10^159 points in the universe
We can also use time as well using planks time of around 10^-41 and the age of the universe. 4 * 10^58 maybe about 10 * 61 in the meaningful lifetime of the universe (assuming it is finite) then 10^220 instances in the universe.

So if you want to know the number of points on a line it cannot exceed 10^53
Or the number of points on a plane it will be up to 10^106
All big numbers - but not infinity.

Maybe there is no non hypothetical equation the universe ever has to do that involves a number bigger than the result of all of this? Physics equations could still have infinities in them but they would be errors and assumptions as opposed to real parts of the explanation for how the universe works.

possible?

3 Comments:

Blogger Nick S. said...

well a finite infinity probably does exist inside the multiverse (not universe) because if the big bang really did happen then the universe will extend into the multiverse finitely and infinitly

6:36 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Infinity as I see it is relative. For example if we shrunk ourselves to the size of a molecule, all finite lengths like a millimeter, centimeter, etc. will seem to be infinite spaces. The boundary of a country for example in the unit of miles is finite however, the same boundary in the unit of nanometer will be infinite.

3:10 PM  
Blogger Rick Pandya said...

Infinity as I see it is relative. For example if we shrunk ourselves to the size of a molecule, all finite lengths like a millimeter, centimeter, etc. will seem to be infinite spaces. The boundary of a country for example in the unit of miles is finite however, the same boundary in the unit of nanometer will be infinite.

3:11 PM  

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